Kenya

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Project overview

Boxgirls Kenya uses boxing to support at-risk girls in underserved slum communities in Nairobi. It builds confidence and leadership skills for girls to lead safe and dignified lives and to be change agents for the advancement of others. By using non-traditional sport of boxing, BG aims to break gender stereotypes about girls' involvement in male-dominated spaces and have girls valued as equal members of the community, with decision making power over issues that affect them.

Boxgirls has a network of sister organisations including Boxgirls in South Africa, and Germany.

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Project data

Project overview

Unemployment in Kenya stands at 40%, with 70% of those unemployed between 15-35. This high level of unemployment contributes to escalating incidents of crime and insecurity in the country. Among the urban poor, the majority of young people have little or no workplace skills and are therefore largely excluded from productive economic and social life. In Mathare, a slum district of Nairobi home to 800,000 people, many female youth turn to prostitution as a means of livelihood, with male youth resorting to joining gangs and engaging in criminal activities. MYSA works with 24,000 young people per year, integrating a work-readiness curriculum into weekly football leagues spanning the city – from teaching their beneficiaries FIFA-certified skills such as coaching and refereeing, to targeting youth in the slums and training them to fill vacancies in the construction sector, to foundational entrepreneurship skills so that young people are well prepared should they want to start their own businesses.

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Project data

  • Mathare Youth Sports Association (MYSA)
  • Country :
  • Sport type: Football
  • Social issue: Health

Project overview

MTG uses an award-winning football curriculum to empower girls in rural Kilifi, on the coast of Kenya. These districts are the poorest in Kenya with 70% below the poverty line. Low school retention, early pregnancies and forced marriages trap girls in a cycle of intense poverty. Only around 20% of girls transition from Primary to Secondary school, meaning 240,000 girls aged 9-25 in Kilifi are out of school and probably out of work.

Women in this age bracket in Kenya are four times more likely to be infected with HIV than men in the same group. Girls as young as 10 are exposed to sex tourism and one in every four women aged 15-19 has a child. Access or knowledge to sexual and reproductive health and services is low. MTG addresses all these issues, working with 5,000 girls per year to address and advance gender equality, increase knowledge of reproductive health, and enable and improve school attendance, reducing the growing feminisation of poverty in Kenya.

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